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HUB


Title : HUB
Author : Daniel Innes
Nationality : British
Year : 2016
Location : space
Biography : Team HUB: Sasha McKinlay, Sacha Moreau
Type : Ecosystem
Scale : Object
Size : -
Capacity : -

Eventually we will reach a point where non-renewable ways of living cannot be maintained. Global warming and depletion of natural resources are beginning to cause severe problems for humanity, and food and water supplies are becoming more and more strained. This document proposes a glimpse into a workable future, where humanity can exist peacefully and non-expansively. Instead of countries, islands, or planets, the future could be comprised of hubs: self-sufficient microcommunities who together form a macrocommunity. HUBS will be connected to eachother digitally as well as physically. Virtual reality and advances in communication will render the physical environment a space for calmer living. Each hub is a conceived as a hollow sphere. Agriculture systems and habitation exist on the outer surface, with living spaces pressed into the surface to form micro-communities. Agriculture will evolve from land-based systems on Earth into lab-based systems. Each hubs’ food is grown there, to create food self-sufficiency and prevent parasitic ‘megacities’. Hanging gardens and integrated farming systems will scale-down food production to the human scale. Industry, Services, and Infrastructure all happen beneath the skin. Industrial production lies on the inner crust of the void, so space-traffic can make deliveries and collections without disturbing the residents above. Services are managed by the central core, which will collect and distribute solar/biofuel energy throughout the system. ‘Roads’ between the crust and the core also provide channels for deliveries and services, as well as forming the structural chassis. Expansive and colonialist attitudes towards humanity’s future are only going to perpetuate its difficulties. It is not our place to exploit the world around us. Perhaps, with systems such as this, we can look at a future which is truly sustainable.

Descriptive of Author : "A change of pace"